Pandemic Perspectives

This morning’s Chicago Tribune has a cover article about teenagers who are essential workers during the pandemic, balancing school and work and concern for their families.

I read the newspaper every morning and often notice an article I want to share here because we need to recognize the wide variety of experiences people are having during the shelter-in-place. COVID-19 affects all of us, but it does not affect all of us in the same way.

“My dad used to work 45 hours a week and now he can barely get 30 hours,” one Chicago Public Schools student wrote in an online petition seeking relief from the district’s grading policy for remote learning. “He doesn’t make enough for bills and food so I started to work two jobs of a combined 50 hours so I can help with the bills. I can’t even do homework.”

(Chicago Tribune, May 26, 2020)

Families organize themselves in part based on access to resources. When a family has stable housing, plenty of food, and steady income, then children are not responsible to earn an income for the household. When a family does not have the resources to meet everyone’s needs, children might carry a heavier load.

“One Chicago high school student aced a physics test by sending a set of photos showing his work, according to his teacher at George Westinghouse College Prep.

“He showed all his work on napkins, which he did while working at the grocery store to support his family,” the teacher tweeted. “And it was a perfect score.”

(Chicago Tribune, May 26, 2020)

The courage and resilience of a teen who completes school while helping to support their family during a global health crisis – it is stunning. God bless them.

Article cited: Teen essential workers juggle labor, fear, stress — and remote learning — to help support their families by Hannah Leone. Some access to the Chicago Tribune is available for free, but please consider paying for a subscription. Journalism is an essential service.